Special Issues of VPR

vpr.47.2_frontCertain issues of the Victorian Periodicals Review are largely devoted to a particular theme under the management of guest editors. Below are tables of contents for special issues, which (along with other issues) can be accessed by subscribers online at Project Muse (2005-present) and JSTOR (2004).


A Return to Theory. VPR 48.3 (Fall 2015). Matthew Philpotts, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Linda K. Hughes, Remembering Linda Peterson.
  • Matthew Philpotts, Introduction to the Special Issue: A Return to Theory.
  • Laurel Brake, Looking Back.
  • Margaret Beetham, Time: Periodicals and the Time of the Now.
  • James Mussell, Repetition: Or, “In Our Last”.
  • Nathan K. Hensley, Network: Andrew Lang and the Distributed Agencies of Literary Production.
  • Dallas Liddle, Genre: “Distant Reading” and the Goals of Periodicals Research.
  • Matthew Philpotts, Dimension: Fractal Forms and Periodical Texture.

Digital Pedagogies. VPR 48.2 (Summer 2015). Clare Horrocks and Kim Edwards Keates, guest editors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Clare Horrocks and Kim Edwards Keates, Introduction to the Special Issue: Digital Pedagogies.
  • Anne Dewitt, Advances in the Visualization of Data: The Network of Genre in the Victorian Periodical Press.
  • Jennifer Phegley, Rethinking Student Research and Writing in the Digital Age: The Punch Historical Archive, 1841-1992 and the NINES Classroom Exhibit Space.
  • Caley Ehnes and Kylee-Anne Hingston, Collaborative Knowledge and Merging Media: Teaching Victorian Periodical Print Using Digital Tools.
  • Kristin Mahoney and Kaitlyn Abrams, Periodical Pedagogy in the Undergraduate Classroom.
  • Linda Friday, Discovering Dracula’s Coffins in the Digital Archive.
  • Seth Cayley and Clare Horrocks, The Punch Historical Archive, 1841-1992: A Sustainable Brand for the Digital Age.
  • Laurel Brake, London Letter: Researching the Historical Press, Now and Here.
  • Bob Nicholson, Tweeting the Victorians.
  • Paul Fyfe, Technologies of Serendipity.
  • Patrick Leary, Response: Search and Serendipity.
  • Marysa Demoor and Marianne Van Remoortel, The Roots of RSVP: An Interview with Founding RSVP President Michael Wolff.
  • Anna Peak, Oscar Wilde in Philadelphia: The Rosenbach Exhibition.

Tradition and the New. VPR 47.4 (Winter 2014). Natalie M. Houston and Margaret Beetham, guest editors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Charlotte Boman, ‘Peculiarly marked with the character of our own time’: Photography and Family Values in Victorian Domestic Journalism.
  • Richard Menke, Touchstones and Tit-Bits: Extracting Culture in the 1880s.
  • Richard J. Butler, British Solutions to Irish Problems: Representations of Ireland in the British Architectural Press, 1837-1853.
  • Teja Varma Pusapati, Novel Networks: The “Specialite” of the English Woman’s Journal.
  • Emma Liggins, Not an Ordinary “Ladies’ Paper”: Work, Motherhood, and Temperance Rhetoric in the Woman’s Signal, 1894-1899.
  • Elizabeth Penner, “The Squire of Boyhood”: G. A. Hutchinson and the Boy’s Own Paper.

Work and Leisure. VPR 46.3 (Fall 2013). Andrew King, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • John Drew, ‘2011 Michael Wolff Lecture: An Uncommercial Proposition?: At Work on Household Words and All the Year Round’.
  • Silvana Colella, ‘“That inscrutable something”: Business in the Periodical Press’.
  • Erika Behrisch Elce, ‘“One of the bright objects that solace us in these regions”: Labour, Leisure, and the Arctic Shipboard Periodical, 1820-1852’.
  • Jennifer Scott, ‘Reciprocal Investments: John Galt, the Periodical Press, and the Business of North American Emigration’.
  • Usha Wilbers, ‘“Who are we to judge?”: Issues of Identity and Cultural Authority in Late Victorian Metacritical Debate’.
  • Minna Vuohelainen, ‘“Contributing to Most Things”: Richard Marsh, Literary Production, and the Fin de Siècle Periodicals Market’.

Victorian Networks and the Periodical Press. VPR 44.2 (Summer 2011). Alexis Easley, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Alexis Easley, ‘Introduction to the Special Issue: Victorian Networks and the Periodical Press’.
  • Laurel Brake, ‘“Time’s Turbulence”: Mapping Journalism Networks’.
  • Joanne Shattock, ‘Professional Networking, Masculine and Feminine’.
  • Laura Rotunno, ‘Blackfriars: the Post Office Magazine: A Nineteenth-Century Network of the “Happy Ignorant”’.
  • Julie F. Codell, ‘The Art Press and its Parodies: Unraveling Networks in Swinburne’s 1868 Academy Notes’.
  • Marysa Demoor and Frederick Morel, ‘Laurence Binyon and the Belgian Artistic Scene: Unearthing Unkown Brotherhoods’.

SupplementsVPR 43.2 (Summer 2010). Marysa Demoor and Kate Macdonald, guest editors.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Marysa Demoor and Kate Macdonald, ‘Finding and Defining the Victorian Supplement’.
  • Laurel Brake, ‘Lost and Found: Serial Supplements in the Nineteenth Century’.
  • Mark W. Turner, ‘Companions, Supplements, and the Proliferation of Print in the 1830s’.
  • B. E. Maidment, ‘Subversive Supplements: Satirical Title Pages of the Periodical Press in the 1830s’.
  • Andrew King, ‘“Killing Time,” or Mrs. Braby’s Peppermints: The Double Economy of the Family Herald and the Family Herald Supplements’.
  • Jolein De Ridder, ‘What? How? Why?: Broadening the Mind with the Treasury of Literature (1868-1875), Supplement to the Ladies’ Treasury (1857-1895)’.
  • Koenraad Claes, ‘Supplements and Paratext: The Rhetoric of Space’.

Fortieth Anniversary IssueVPR 41.1 (Spring 2008). Rosemary T. VanArsdel, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Part I. Prelude.
  • Rosemary T. VanArsdel, ‘“The Great Unexplored Continent of 19th-Century Studies”: Victorian Periodicals (David De Laura, 1968)’.
  • Part II. The Editors.
  • Michael Wolff, ‘In the Beginning’.
  • Dorothy Deering, ‘The Victorian Periodicals Newsletter (VPN), January, April and July 1970’.
  • Rosemary Vanarsdel, ‘Hanging On: James Ellis, et al, 1970-1973’.
  • Hans De Groot, ‘An Old Editor Remembers: VPN/VPR at Toronto, 1973-85’.
  • Merrill Distad, ‘From VPN to VPR: The Toronto Years, 1973-1984’.
  • Rosemary T. VanArsdel, ‘Coming of Age: the Barbara Quinn Schmidt Years, 1985-1993’.
  • Richard Fulton, ‘The Long Transition: 1993-1996’.
  • William H. Scheuerle, ‘Victorian Periodicals Review: 29:4 (Winter 1996) to 37:3 (Fall 2004)’.
  • Part III. The Bibliographers.
  • J. Don Vann, ‘The Pioneer Bibliography’.
  • Larry K. Uffelman, ‘The RSVP Checklist & Me: A Personal History’.
  • Rosemary VanArsdel, ‘Victorian Periodicals Review Annual Bibliographies’.
  • Part IV. Epilogue.
  • Kathryn Ledbetter, ‘Today and Tomorrow: Meeting the Digital Challenge’.

Periodical PedagogyVPR 39.4 (Winter 2006). Teresa Mangum, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Teresa Mangum, ‘Periodicals, Pedagogy, and Collaboration’.
  • Part I. Frameworks for Periodical Studies.
  • Mark W. Turner, ‘Time, Periodicals, and Literary Studies’.
  • Linda K. Hughes, ‘Victorian Literature and Periodicals: Mid-Victorian Culture Wars and Cultural Negotiations, A Graduate Seminar’.
  • Andrea Kaston Tange, ‘“Becoming a Victorian Reader”: The Serial Reading Process in the Modern Classroom’.
  • Jennifer Phegley, Madaline Guilfoil, Kristin Huston, Erin Speck, and Robert Haselwander, ‘Collaboration and the Periodical Press: Assigning a Group Project to Uncover Victorian Publishing Practices’.
  • Part II. Interdisciplinarity and Periodical Studies.
  • Julianne Smith, ‘Victorian Drama and Undergraduate Periodical Research’.
  • Leigh G. Dillard, Patricia Okker, and Nancy Martha West: ‘Teaching Illustrations and Periodicals: Three Scholars Share Their Ideas and Materials’.
  • Part III. The Political Geographies and Periodical Studies.
  • Susan David Bernstein, ‘Periodical Partners: A Context for Teaching Victorian Literature and Science’.
  • Karen Margaret Steele, ‘Studying the Artful Contenders of Empire: The Poetics of the Irish News’.
  • Julie F. Codell, ‘Imperial Differences and Culture Clashes in Victorian Periodicals’ Visuals: The Case ofPunch’.
  • Rechelle Christie, ‘An Undergraduate American Literature and Identity Course Looks East to Great Britain’.
  • Conclusion. From Classroom to Career.
  • Teresa Mangum, ‘Periodicals to Pedagogy to the Profession of Literary Studies’.

Interdisciplinary Work and Periodical ConnectionsVPR 38.2 (Summer 2005). Andrea Broomfield, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Andrea Broomfield, ‘Interdisciplinary Work and Periodicals Connections: An Issue in Honour of Sally H. Mitchell’.
  • Maria Frawley, ‘Behind the Scenes of History: Harriet Martineau and The Lowell Offering’.
  • Linda K. Hughes, ‘Constructing Fictions of Authorship in George Eliot’s Middlemarch, 1871-1872’.
  • Jennifer Phegley, ‘Domesticating the Sensation Novelist: Ellen Price Wood as Author and Editor of the Argosy Magazine’.
  • Solveig C. Robinson, ‘Expanding a “Limited Orbit”: Margaret Oliphant, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazineand the Development of a Critical Voice’.
  • Talia Schaffer, ‘Craft, Authorial Anxiety, and the “Cranford Papers”’.
  • Clare Cotungo, ‘“Stay Away from Paris!” Frances Trollope Rewrites America’.

Australian, New Zealand, and South African PeriodicalsVPR 37 (Winter 2004). Rosemary VanArsdel, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Rosemary VanArsdel, Introduction to Special Issue
  • Elizabeth Webby, ‘Images of Europe in Two Nineteenth-Century Australian Illustrated Magazines’.
  • Brian Cheadle, ‘South African Serial Publications of the Anglo-Boer War’.
  • Terry Barringer, ‘What Mrs. Jellyby Might Have Read. Missionary Periodicals; A Neglected Source’.
  • Graham Law, ‘Savouring of the Australian Soil?: On the Sources and Affiliations of Colonial Newspaper Fiction’.
  • Lucy Sussex, ‘“Bobbing Around” James Skipp Borlaise, Adam Lindsay Gordon, and Surviving in the Literary Market of Australia, 1860s’.
  • Meg Tasker, ‘Two Versions of Colonial Nationalism: The Australian Review of Reviews v. the SydneyBulletin’.

The 19th-Century Press in IndiaVPR 37 (Summer 2004). Julie Codell, guest editor.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Julie F. Codell, ‘Introduction: The Nineteenth-Century News from India’.
  • Máire ní Fhlathúin, ‘The Campaign Against Thugs in the Bengal Press in the 1830s’.
  • Edwin Hirschmann, ‘The Hidden Roots of a Great Newspaper: Calcutta’s Statesman’.
  • Debapriya Paul, ‘Hindoo Patriot and Hurish Chunder Mookerjea: A Study in Colonial Resistance’.
  • Krishna Sen, ‘Lessons in Self-Fashioning: Bamabodhini Patrika and the Education of Women in Colonial Bengal’.
  • Peter H. Hoffenberg, ‘Promoting Traditional Indian Art at Home and Abroad: The Journal of Indian Art and Industry, 1884-1917’.
  • Julie F. Codell, ‘Getting the Twain to Meet: Global Regionalism in East and West: A Monthly Review’.
  • Krishna Sen and Debapriya Paul, ‘Archival Press Project, English Department, University of Calcutta: The Calcutta Review’.