Workshop Report: Working with 19th-Century Medical and Health Periodicals, University of Oxford, 30 May 2015

The workshop ‘Working with 19th-Century Medical and Health Periodicals’ was held on 30 May 2015 and co-organized by the ERC-funded ‘Diseases of Modern Life’ Project and the AHRC-funded ‘Constructing Scientific Communities’ Project, both based at St. Anne’s College, University of Oxford. The aim of the event was to facilitate conversation about the use of medical and health periodicals in historical and literary research, a resource which has been central not only to the work of the aforementioned projects, but also to that of many other scholars interested in various aspects of nineteenth-century history and literature. The programme was interdisciplinary, trans-institutional, bringing together both librarians and researchers, and international in its approach, with papers covering an impressive array of topics and countries, including Britain, China, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Poland, Portugal, and Russia. Overall, approximately 60 participants based at institutions in the United Kingdom, Portugal, Norway, Austria, and the United States attended the workshop and a total of 18 papers were presented. The workshop also featured two poster presentations by Ann Hale (University of Greenwich) and Bernhard Leitner (University of Vienna), on medical jurisprudence in legal periodicals and the role of neurological journals in the development of Japanese psychiatry, respectively.

Full details available on their blog site: https://networks.h-net.org/node/14542/discussions/72773/workshop-report-working-19th-century-medical-and-health-periodicals

In Memoriam: Linda Peterson

Linda H. Peterson, born on October 11, 1948, died peacefully June 25, 2015, on the campus of Yale University, where she was a professor and former chair in the Department of English.  Until days before her death, which ended a multi-year battle against cancer, few friends knew the seriousness of her illness, for she had decided that she wished to focus on the pleasures of her work as an active scholar, finishing her latest book, and as a contributor to university life, which she was, during her 38 years on the faculty.  Her books include Victorian Autobiography (1986), Traditions of Victorian Women’s Autobiography (1999) and Becoming a Woman of Letters (2009). Her work also enriched the teaching of writing nationwide, through her role as general editor of The Norton Reader in five editions published from 1996 through the current edition and in her role as past president of the National Council of Writing Program Administrators.

She will be greatly missed by many colleagues and students; by her mother, Martha Haenlein Boese; by her three younger sisters, Deborah Haenlein Kile, Carla Haenlein Piazza, and Kristy Haenlein Taylor; and by her husband, Fred Strebeigh, her colleague at Yale since 1979.  At her request, there will be no funeral.  Colleagues are creating a fund, in her honor, to support travel by graduate students to conduct research and attend conferences.  A memorial celebrating the publication of her new book, the Cambridge Companion to Victorian Women’s Writing, of which she is editor, with contributions from 17 scholars from around the world, will take place near the book’s publication in late 2015.

Postgraduate Research Blog Launch

We are delighted to announce the launch of our postgraduate research blog.

The Research blog area is a space for our postgraduate students to showcase their research projects and for the wider RSVP community to read and enjoy!

Each post will include the contact details of our featured writer. We encourage you to get in touch with them for further discussion of the topics raised.

Our inaugural post comes from Ann M. Hale (University of Greenwich) and is entitled ‘On Serendipity.’ You can read it here.

If you would like to write a blog post for the website please contact Helena Goodwyn at graduate@rs4vp.org.

CFP Popular Culture – Serial Fictions in Transnational Perspective

CFP: POPULAR CULTURE – SERIAL CULTURE: NINETEENTH-CENTURY SERIAL FICTIONS IN TRANSNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE, 1830S-1860s. 28-30 APRIL 2016, UNIVERSITY OF SIEGEN

This call for papers may be of interest for scholars of 19th-century popular print culture. Daniel Stein and Lisanna Wiele (American Studies, Universität Siegen) are inviting submissions for the conference “Popular Culture – Serial Culture”. From the CfP:

Recent publications such as Transnationalism and American Serial Fiction (Okker 2011) and Serialization in Popular Culture (Allen/van den Berg 2014) remind us that serial modes of storytelling, publication, and reception have been among the driving forces of modern culture since the first half of the nineteenth century. Indeed, as studies of Victorian serial fiction, the French feuilleton novel, and American magazine fiction indicate, much of what we take for granted as central features of contemporary serial fictions traces back to a particular period in the nineteenth century between the 1830s and the 1860s. This is the time when new printing techniques allowed for the mass publication of affordable reading materials, when literary authorship became a viable profession, when reading for pleasure became a popular pastime for increasingly literate and socially diverse audiences, and when previously predominantly national print markets became thoroughly international.

The conveners encourage interdisciplinary and transnational approaches that may go beyond the North American context.

250-word abstracts are due on September 1, 2015.

Further information available on the conference website:

http://www.uni-siegen.de/phil/anglistik/news/633570.html